Personal Computer

Rae Armantrout

I probably got the computer by the late-80's

Bruce Beasley

My office computer … is a desktop. … Windows 7—or that's Windows 8, now. In the summer, like now, I work almost exclusively here on that computer. When I'm at work, when I'm teaching, I am often working a couple of hours a day during the day, and I work mostly on the office computer when I'm doing that. So, I'm always sending files back and forth

Amy Gerstler

I remember when, you know, I first got a computer. It was sort of like, you know, I was ZZ Top. I had a tall music system in here. It was a big, bulky thing and there were things that went under the desk.

Louise Glück

I'm epileptic and I learned, but I didn't like looking at the screen. The early computers, it was said, were not good for epileptics

James McMichael

I love how non-invasive this [the computer] is as a medium—not so much in terms of my being protected against being invaded by somebody else, but being able to say something (send somebody something here [on the computer]) and understand that they can open it when they want, and that it's not an imposition on them

James McMichael

I've really liked the way the computer makes it possible to re-lineate poems that I've gotten from students—just to give them a sense of how I hear what they're doing with the lines. It's been a help. It's been a help to me. I haven't seen much evidence that it means anything at all to them.

K. Silem Mohammad

part of the fun of it was using the computer as a kind of canvas

Robert Pinsky

I used to go through the whole rigmarole of syncing between my desktop and my laptop. I went through various generations of the best way to do that and now I'm not quite at the totally-cloud web system, but I realized that with a nice external monitor, external keyboard, external mouse, I can use the MacBook Pro as what we used to call the ICU

Robert Pinsky

For a good period, I was one of the few people in the country who was writing everything I was writing to read off a screen on a computer, and everything I was writing to read on paper on paper. The Times asked me to review a book of prose by Philip Larkin. I was having a little trouble getting started with it and I had been writing this very fluid Bubble World of computer. I couldn't get started on the Larkin so I decided I'll experiment. I'll see if I can write the lead on the computer, on the monochrome, because it's so much less real than a pen or the typewriter. ... I wound up writing a draft of the whole fucking review on the Atari.

Robert Pinsky

I had a jerky, junkie Dot Matrix printer and what we used to call a PC clone—IBM clone—called a Corona. I think it was made in Italy, oddly enough. That was probably 1981, 1980, or something. It was quite early.

Michael Ryan

I have a personalcpu and an iPad. I don't use the iPad much, but sometimes for internet stuff.

Michael Ryan

I draft poems by hand and then I'll go back to the computer and go sometimes back and forth. Prose, I write on the computer … I don't usually take notes on the computer. I usually will do that by hand.

Michael Ryan

For some reason, I can write prose on the computer-and prefer to write it on the computer-because I will change a lot as I am writing. But why that would be specific and, you know, so distinct from one to the other, is a mystery to me. Maybe just because that I originally wrote prose by hand, too. I only stopped writing it by hand, I think, about 20 years ago

Michael Ryan

Friends had told me-who were writers-that, "You've got to do this. This is amazing and wonderful. Do it." The program assistant at Warren Wilson knew computers, and so I could take some tutorials with her, and she showed me how to do it. And a lot of the writers-it's a low-residency program; two weeks every six months-a lot of the writers were going to her at that time.

Michael Ryan

In the act of writing, again, for the most part, when I'm on the computer for a poem, I'm not composing. I am just typing

Stephanie Strickland

I still had a car at that time, and I wasn't living in the city—and I put my IBM Selectric or whatever in, and would carry it out, or I would rent a computer to have at that place because I wanted the print out, and I still want the print out. It still looks different to me on paper than it does on the screen and you want to know both those aspects

Stephanie Strickland

I was extremely aware with every shift in software, every shift in functionality. It just kind of hits me, what I've lost and what I've gained of anything. So, I always needed to see it both ways. So, I think from the beginning I printed it out and then from the time I had trouble with my hands—which was in 1995, when I first started using Storyspace in a beta version that erased all your links every eleventh save...that was the flaw. I didn't know! It was the first time I used software.

Nance Van Winckel

I work on 3 different computers. This big iMac here that I use and then I have a laptop Mac, and then I also have an iPad

Robert Wrigley

the thing I thought was best about that part of the process, when the computer came along, was that it saved time. I could immediately just look at it on the screen, go back to longhand and then add what I had written in longhand onto whatever I had already saved on the computer.

Robert Wrigley

It changed everything about the poem, having that poem broken into tercets instead of quatrains. That was so easy to do and so easy to examine, to test, with a computer. Let me just backspace here, space here, return here—I just did that,looked at that: "Okay. Bingo!" That sort of thing I think is one of the great things that that part of the technology of the computer helps to facilitate